Friday, February 6, 2009

What do I think I am doing?

I remember in April of 2007 when Penny was only weeks away from being born and I took my 4 year old (almost 5) to a girl's birthday party. This was probably the one of the worst times I had with him. He pulled down his pants to the 5 and 7 year old girls. Good thing the birthday girl's father was drunk and having a good time. He kept laughing that my son like to "drop trou!!" Later, during presents, he seriously crapped his pants. He was about to be 5 years old in July, why was this happening. We left right after that and I cried the whole way home and at home. I couldn't believe I was bringing another life into this world. What business did I have wanting another child when I can't even get the first one right.

The struggle continues. I see such a bright child in front of me. We do a lot of reading; he writes grocery lists for me. We take library trips. He does cub scouts. But we got the letter today. The one that says your son is in very real danger of staying back a year because he is "substantially below proficient" in reading. I just don't see how this is possible. I know that he might not be at proficient at reading yet, maybe he is at the "slightly below" level. But do they honestly think that keeping him back will keep his interest and be beneficial in the long run? Why do they want 6 year olds reading chapter books anyway. CAN'T HE JUST LEARN AT HIS OWN PACE? The expectations set at this age are ridiculous and I am so upset over this my heart is in throat. I don't think we can fit any more reading into the day honestly. And I loved how the letter suggested that we do these things with him. Like they think that we don't interact with him at all.

8 comments:

Cathy said...

Hi Maureen, Thanks for your comments on my blog. To answer your question, Lily had a complete AV canal defect that was repaired last September. She amazes us with the strides she has made since her surgery!

I'm a SAHM now, but I taught 6 year olds in my previous life...lol. I would have to agree with you that A LOT is now expected of kids in school. I didn't learn to read until the middle of first grade...now...I was teaching kindergarteners to read. I also understand that it's almost impossible to find any extra time in the day. Hang in there!

If you have any "teacher" questions, let me know.

Melissa said...

OMGOD! You poor Momma! What a horrible thing for them to say. I feel so bad for Nathaniel:( Hey, we ALL have our weakness's somewhere!!

You'll get through this! I honestly can't suggest anything for I have no experience in this matter...just a great big HUG!

Can't wait to see you tomorrow though....come over around 5ish? CALL ME!!!

Lacey said...

I totally agree. My autistic son is way behind his peers. But I couldn't believe they said he should be reading in kindergarten. I mean my kids went to preschool, but kindergarten is where they are getting started. I think their expectations are way to high.

Lynne said...

Their expectations ARE too high...and I know what I'm talking about, having raised 4 geniuses!
You should...in writing...ask to have him tested for disabilities and you should have his eyes checked. There is nothing wrong with the Boy...but...it can't hurt to find out HIS best way of learning and that's what the upshot of all this testing is.
And don't worry about him doing 1st grade another year...even the thought of him staying back is absurd and probably just that carrot-and-stick method of motivating parents.
Any kid that age who can play chess is much too bright to be repeating a grade!
Love,

Lynne said...

oopsy...forgot to mention with all the problems I had remembering the password to post the previous....
waaaaayyyyyy back when I was just a young lassie in the 1st grade, I was in the 'slow' reading group. This was before I got my glasses...and before my mom signed me up for the Nancy Drew Mystery book club...
Love you,
Mom

datri said...

With reading, some kids get it quickly and some don't. I agree with requesting an evaluation in writing to see if there is an underlying disability. If there is, then the school can teach appropriately.

And besides, I found that it's a good "test run" of the system. I had my older daughter evaluated in PreK (she was eventually diagnosed with PDD-NOS) and by the time my daughter with Down syndrome hit PreK age I was already familiar with how the whole IEP process works.

Lacey said...

Theres an award for you on my blog

jess said...

Hugs! And I just passed on a blog award to you, go my blog for details :)